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PAN MEETS A FLOWER - David Yuri Tipe

Many artists share Shakespeare's creed that life is a stage. David Yuri Tipe lived it.

Poet, playwright, performing and visual artist, David Yuri's avant garde productions have graced the stages of Toronto and New York theatres alike. Among them are the Tarragon Theatre, Theatre Passe Muraille and the Factory Theatre Lab. His Cabbagetown Trilogy, one of the first plays to deal with a local white ghetto, was chosen as the inaugural presentation of Toronto's Tarragon Theatre. A selection of his plays are archived at the Canadian Writer's Association.

His energetic dancing was analogous to Pan teasing life: daringly on the edge of falling, yet always catching himself before the inevitable tumble and ascending to higher levels of delight and joy. Laurence O'Toole of the Globe & Mail once noted "he makes other experimental dances seem petty in force and contrived in direction".

As a boy, he chose the confirmation name Francisco, after St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals, birds and the love of nature. David Yuri's portrait fittingly captures a blend of his love of nature, play and a deep passion and respect for all life.

As with all who search for their own truth, David had a deeply introspective mind and an insatiable curiosity about life. While his journals reveal that he seldom found satisfying answers to his questions, the body of work that is his legacy speaks volumes of the joy found in his searching. David passed from this life in his 50th year, on New Year's Day, 1998.

Dance, David! Dance!

"I work from awkwardness.
By that I mean that I don't like to arrange things.
If I stand in front of something, instead of arranging it,
I arrange myself."

-- Diane Arbus

© 2001. The Arkangel Project.